Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Some Stapletons in the Americas Prior to 1800

Some Stapletons in the Americas Prior to 1800 More or Less in Chronological Order Compiled by William C. Stapleton, Jr.

1    Pierce Stapleton, age 22, was to be transported to St. Christophers (one of the Leeward Islands now known
     as St. Kitts) from London in the ship Mathew 21 May 1635. [Samuel G. Drake: Result of Some Researches
     Among the British Archives for Information Relative to the Founders of New England, 3rd ed., p. 107; Boston
     (1865)] [John Camden Hotten: The Original Lists of Persons of Quality, p. 81; London (1874)] [Michael
     Tepper: Passengers to America, p. 66; Baltimore (1980)]

2    Bryant Stapleton was transported in 1659 to Maryland. [Gust Skordas: The Early Settlers of Maryland,
     p. 437; Baltimore (1968)]

3    Thomas Stapleton was transported to Virginia by Mr. John Edwards who on 22 March 1663/4 received
     headrights on the north side of the Rappahannoch River. [Nell Marion Nugent: Cavaliers and Pioneers,
     Vol. 1, p. 530; Richmond (1934)]

4    Lt. Col. William Stapleton was appointed Deputy-Governor of Montserrat in 1668. In 1672 Col. Stapleton
     was appointed Governor of the Leeward Islands. Born in Ireland, he married the daughter of Lt. Col. Russell
     on Nevis in 1671. He went to France for his health about 1686 and died shortly thereafter. His brother, Lt.
     Col. Redmond (mistakenly listed as Robert, Edward, or Edmund in some records) Stapleton was appointed
     Lieutenant Governor of Montserrat when Sir William moved to the Leeward Islands post. By 1675 he had
     gone home for his health and died by 1687. [W. Noel Sainsbury and J. W. Fortescue, editors: Calendar of
     State Papers, Colonial Series, America and West Indies, 1661-1688, Vols. 5, 7, 9-12, passim; London
     (1880-1899)] [John Camden Hotten: The Original Lists of Persons of Quality, pp. 161*-162; London,
     (1874)]

5    Samuel Stapleton emigrated from London to Newport, Rhode Island, married Mary White. Their children
     were: Mary, born 7 February 1679; Ann, born 20 January 1680; Mary and Elizabeth (Twins), born 7 June
     1681; and Samuel, born 28 September 1682. [James Savage: A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers
     of New England, Showing Three Generations of Those Who Came Before May, 1692, on the Basis of
     Farmer's Register; Vol. IV, p. 169; Boston (1860-1862)]

6    Thomas and Frances Stapleton had at least four children born in Middlesex County, Virginia: John
     Stapleton born 10 August 1683, George Stapleton born 26 November and baptised 10 January 1685/6 and
     died 8 January 1720, Thomas Stapleton (See No. 23) christened 11 December 1689, and Ann Stapleton born
     14 September 1693. Frances probably died soonafter for Thomas and Mary had a daughter Jane (See
     No. 26) who was baptized 1 October 1704. [The Parish Register of Christ Church, Middlesex County, Va.
     from 1653 to 1812, passim; Baltimore (1975)] On 6 July 1683 Dr. Thomas Stapleton was ordered to care
     for Henry Freiston by the court in Middlesex County. Thomas Stapleton was listed as a juryman on 16
     December 1686 in Middlesex County, Virginia. [Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 12,
     p. 189; 1904-05] Thomas Stapleton was listed on 23 November 1687 on a militia roster for Middlesex
     County, Virginia. [William Armstrong Crozier: Virginia Colonial Militia, p. 98; Baltimore (1954)] Thomas
     Stapleton was listed as a legatee in the will of Dr. Walter Whitaker who died on 27 July 1692 in Middlesex
     County, Virginia. [Virginia Historical Magazine, Vol. 22, No. 1, p. 50; January 1914] Thomas Stapleton
     on 24 April 1703 received headrights in Middlesex County for transporting 3 persons. [Nell Marion Nugent:
     Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. 3, p. 70; Richmond (1979)] [Virginia County Records Quarterly Magazine,
     Vol. VII, No. 2., p. 84; June 1910] Virginia Quit Rent Rolls for 1704 list Thomas Stapleton with 200 acres
     in King and Queen County. [Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 32, p. 155; 1924] The will
     of Thomas Stapleton, dated 19 July 1706, was recorded in Middlesex County on 6 November 1706. Wife
     Mary (See No. 17) was appointed executrix. Children John, George, Thomas, and Anne were mentioned.
     [Clayton Torrence: Virginia Wills and Administrations 1632-1800, p. 400; Baltimore (1965)] [William
     Lindsay Hopkins: Middlesex County, Virginia Wills and Inventories 1673-1812 and Other Court Papers,
     passim; Richmond (1989)]

7    John Stapleton was transported to Virginia by Coll. Edmond Scarburgh who on 9 October 1667 received
     headrights, probably in Accomack County. [Nell Marion Nugent: Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. 2, p. 23;
     Richmond (1977)]

8    Ann Stapleton was transported in 1674 to Maryland. [Gust Skordas: The Early Settlers of Maryland, p. 437;
     Baltimore (1968)]

9    John Stapledonn, a servant, was transported between 1675 and 1680 to Maryland. [Gust Skordas: The Early
     Settlers of Maryland, p. 437; Baltimore (1968)]

10   Walter Stapleton had a ticket granted on 5 May 1679 to travel in the ship Society from Barbados to Bristol.
     [John Camden Hotten: The Originals Lists of Persons of Quality, p. 405; London (1874)]

11   William Stapleton and Jane Stapleton were transported to Virginia by Ambrose White who on 25 March
     1672 received headrights (twice for William) in Northhampton County. [Nell Marion Nugent: Cavaliers and
     Pioneers, Vol. 2, p. 105; Richmond (1977)]

12   John Stapleton was transported to Virginia by Maj. Francis Sayer who on 21 October 1684 received
     headrights in Lower Norfolk County. [Nell Marion Nugent: Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. 2, p. 284;
     Richmond (1977)]

13   Micholas (Nicholas?) Stapleton witnessed a deed in Charles Town, Carolina, in 1693. [Caroline T. Moore:
     Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692-1721, p. 117; Columbia, South Carolina
     (1978)]

14   Rebecka Stapleton was transported to Virginia by Mr. George Archer who on 21 April 1695 received
     headrights in Henrico County. [Nell Marion Nugent: Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. 2, p. 399; Richmond
     (1977)]

15   Thomas Stapleton, age 18, indentured servant, went to Middlesex County, Virginia, in 1699/1700. [Lloyd
     Dewitt Bockstruck: "Some Immigrants to Middlesex County in the Colony of Virginia, 1674-1702" in The
     Virginia Genealogist, Vol. 25, No. 2, p. 97; April-June 1981]

16   Captain Robert Stapylton, commander of HMS Jersey, had an inventory of his estate filed 9 March 1702/03
     in New York. [National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 54, No. 4, p. 258; December 1966]

17   Mary Stapleton, possibly the widow of Thomas (See No. 6), married Alexander Graves on 6 April 1708
     in Middlesex County, Virginia. [Dorothy Ford Wulfeck: Marriages of Some Virginia Residents 1607-1800,
     Series I, Vol.3, p. 139; Naugatuck, Connecticut (1967)] In August 1715, Alexander Graves of Christ
     Church, Middlesex County, sold 200 acres in Essex County to George Stapleton for 50 Sterling. [Beverley
     Fleet: Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. 2, p.70; Baltimore (1988 reprint)]

18   John Stapleton had an inventory of his estate filed in 1710 in Middlesex County, Virginia. [Clayton
     Torrence: Virginia Wills and Administrations 1632-1800, p. 400; Baltimore (1965)]

19   Job Stapleton made payments to the estate of Sem Cox in 1712 and 1713 in Richmond County, Virginia.
     [Beverly Fleet: Virginia Colonial Extracts, Vol. 1, pp. 304-306; Baltimore (1988 reprint)]

20   Henry Stapleton was transported to Virginia by Samuel Duchimin who on 16 June 1714 received headrights
     in Essex County. [Nell Marion Nugent: Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. 3, p. 149; Richmond (1979)]

21   Robert P. Stapleton was born in England about 1690. He migrated to Oley, Pennsylvania, about 1715. He
     moved to Shenandoah, Virginia, about 1750 and died near Quicksburgh, Virginia, in 1770. His children
     were John (No. 22), Tobias (No. 41), William (died 1785 Oley, Pennsylvania), Charles (No. 59),
     Elizabeth, Mary (married Frederick Painter), Sarah (married Conrad Arnold), Catherine (married Samuel
     Dark), Margaret (married Fred Cutley), and Barbara (married Henry Keitner). [American Ancestry,
     Vol. IX, pp. 76-77; Albany, New York (1894)] 

22   John Stapleton (See No. 21) was born 1715-1720 and died 1754 in Oley, Pennsylvania. He married Maria
     Margaretta Geiger on 10 March 1747 at the Reformed Church, Falkner Swamp, Montgomery County,
     Pennsylvania. [Pennsylvania Archives, Series 2, Vol. 8, p. 656: Harrisburg (1896 Reprint)] and had a son
     John (No. 42) [American Ancestry, Vol. IX, pp. 76-77; Albany, New York (1894)] 

23   Thomas Stapleton (See No. 6) married Mary Williamson on 7 August 1718 in Middlesex County, Virginia.
     Frances Stapleton, daughter of Thomas and Mary, was born 17 June and baptized 5 July 1719. [The Parish
     Register of Christ Church, Middlesex County, Va. from 1653 to 1812, p. 103; Baltimore (1975)]

24   George Stapleton, Jr. had his will recorded in 1720 in Middlesex County, Virginia. [Clayton Torrence:
     Virginia Wills and Administrations 1632-1800, p. 400; Baltimore (1965)]

25   George Stapleton, age 18, of Edmonton, Middlesex, England, was apprenticed for four years in Maryland
     to John Taylor of London, a yeoman, on 7 September 1720. [Jack and Marion Kaminkow: A List of
     Emigrants from England to America 1718-1759, p. 215; Baltimore (1964)]

26   Jane Stapleton (See No. 6) married Thomas Norman on 23 November 1721 in Middlesex County, Virginia.

27   George Stapleton married Jane Black in February 1722 in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

28   Ann Stapleton married William Moore on 20 January 1723 in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.


29   William Stapleton, age 16, of Marlborough, Wiltshire, England, was apprenticed for 7 years in Pennsylvania
     to John Dykes of London, victualer, on 13 September 1723. [Jack and Marion Kaminkow: A List of
     Emigrants from England to America 1718-1759, p. 215; Baltimore (1964)]

30   Joyce, illegitimate daughter of Elizabeth Stapleton, was born 3 December and baptized 17 January 1724 in
     Middlesex County, Virginia. [The Parish Register of Christ Church, Middlesex County, Va. from 1653 to
     1812, pp. 116; Baltimore (1975)]

31   Elizabeth Stapleton married Thomas Ferrril at Christ Church, Philadelphia, on 9 August 1725.
     [Pennsylvania Archives, Series 2, Vol. 8, p. 251: Harrisburg (1896 Reprint)]

32   Joseph Stapleton on 7 July 1726 was granted land in Brunswick County, Virginia. [Nell Marion Nugent:
     Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. 3, p. 316; Richmond (1979)] [William Armstrong Crozier: Virginia County
     Records Quarterly Magazine, Vol. VII, No. 3., p. 137; September 1910; Baltimore (1971 reprint)]

33   Thomas Stapleton had his will proved on 14 December 1732 in Caroline County, Virginia. Mary Stapleton
     was appointed executrix and William Stapleton was appointed executor. [Virginia Magazine of History and
     Biography, Vol. 20, p. 202; 1912] William Stapleton served one term as a juror in Caroline County,
     Virginia, between 1732 and 1745. In 1735 he was appointed as executor or administrator of the estate of
     John Plant. [T. E. Campbell: Colonial Caroline A History of Caroline County, Virginia, pp. 354, 470;
     Richmond (1954)]

34   Charles Stapleton and Sarah Stapleton were sentenced for felonies in Middlesex, England, in January 1733
     and transported aboard the ship Smith in February 1733 to either Maryland or Virginia. [Peter Wilson
     Coldham: Bonded Passengers to America, Vol. II, p. 252; Baltimore, (1983)] [Marion and Jack Kaminkow:
     Original Lists of Emigrants in Bondage from London to the American Colonies, 1719-1744, p. 148;
     Baltimore (1967)]

35   William Stapleton married Lucy Hardin on 21 September 1733 in Middlesex County, Virginia. Elizabeth
     Stapleton (See No. 37), daughter of William and Lucy Stapleton, was born 25 October 1734 in Middlesex
     County, Virginia. Lucy died 23 April 1742. [The Parish Register of Christ Church, Middlesex County, Va.
     from 1653 to 1812, pp. 140, 194; Baltimore (1975)]

36   Edward Stapleton was in Baltimore County, Maryland, at least from 1736 to 1765. On 21 March 1736 he
     purchased 150 acres at Paradise and still owned that land in 1750. He married Rachel ___ and they had
     children Alce (Alice?) born 10 June 1737, Joseph (No. 62) born 5 February 1742, Hannah born 14 May
     1744, Joshua (No. 64) born 22 June 1746, and Edward born 1 August 1749. On 27 August 1764 Edward
     Stapleton administered the estate of John Stapleton in Baltimore. [Robert W. Bartnes: Baltimore County
     Families, 1659-1759, Genealogical Publishing Co., p. 606] Edward Stapleton gave an Oath of Fidelity
     during the March 1778 term of the court in Harford County, Maryland. [Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh:
     Maryland Records, Vol. II, p. 235; Lancaster, Pennsylvania (1928)] In 1778 in Capt. Armstrong's District
     of Rowan County, North Carolina, Edward Stapleton was listed as a "Pole" and Edward Stapleton, Jr. was
     on the Tax List with property valued at 225. [Mrs. Stahle Linn, Jr.:Abstracts of Wills and Estates Records
     of Rowan County, North Carolina; 1753-1805 and Tax Lists 0f 1759 and 1778; pp. 121-122]

37   On 3 June 1746 Armistead Churchill was appointed guardian to Elizabeth Stapleton (See No. 35), orphan
     of William Stapleton. On 4 October 1848 William Johnston replaced Armistead Churchill. Elizabeth
     Stapleton was a legatee in the will of her uncle, George Hardin. His will dated 31 October 1733 was proved
     2 April 1745 in Middlesex County, Virginia. [Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 35, p. 416;
     1927] She was probably the same Elizabeth Stapleton who married Walter Keeble on 29 November 1755
     in Middlesex County with Thomas Hardin as surety. [Elizabeth P. Bently: Virginia Marriage Bonds, p. 322;
     Baltimore (1984)] [William and Mary Quarterly, Series 1, Vol. 20, No. 1, p. 289, July 1911] [William
     Lindsay Hopkins: Middlesex County, Virginia Wills and Inventories 1673-1812 and Other Court Papers,
     pp. 99, 102; Richmond (1989)]

38   Miles Stapleton was Captain of HMS Sheerness carrying 150 men based in Jamaica. On a voyage from Porto
     Bello in 1739 he flew the French colors and deceived the Spanish fleet. [The Virginia Gazette, 9 November
     1739, p. 3, col. 2 and 25 January 1740, p. 2]

39   Thomas Stapleton, a servant from Ireland, arrived in Philadelphia in the snow George and was bound to
     William Sandwith, a tallow-chandler for four years beginning 2 August 1746. [George W. Neible: "Servants
     and Apprentices Bound and Assigned Before James Hamilton, Mayor of Philadelphia, 1745" in The
     Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. 100; January 1908] [Michael Tepper:
     Emigrants to Pennsylvania, 1641-1819, p. 143; Baltimore (1975)]

40   Elizabeth Stapleton, daughter of Thomas Lambert, was mentioned in his will dated 1 December 1747 in
     Westmoreland County, Virginia. [William Armstrong Crozier: Virginia County Record Publications, New
     Series, Vol. 1, p. 50; Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey (1913)]

41   Tobias Stableton (See No. 21) was in Albany Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, in 1751 where he died
     in 1805. [Raymond L. Hollenbhack: "Albany Township, Berks County, Early Tithables" in the Central
     Pennsylvania Genealogy Magazine, p. 18; December 1959] [American Ancestry, Vol. IX, pp. 76-77; Albany,
     New York (1894)]

42   John Stapleton (See No. 22) was born in 1751 and died in 1820 at Oley, Pennsylvania. He was married in
     1780 to Rosena Miller and had a son William (No. 74). [American Ancestry, Vol. IX, pp. 76-77; Albany,
     New York (1894)] He was appointed First Lieutenant on 17 May 1777 in the Fourth Company of the First
     Battalion of the Berks County, Pennsylvania, militia during the American Revolution. [Pennsylvania
     Archives, Series 5, Vol. 5, pp. 160, 162] [DAR Lineage Book, Vol. 67, p. 5 (1908)]

43   Benjamin Stapleton and Agnes Morgan were married 3 June 1755 in Cumberland County, Virginia.
     [Elizabeth P. Bently: Virginia Marriage Bonds, p. 170; Baltimore (1984)]

44   Robert Stapleton had his will recorded 1755 in Frederick County, Virginia. [Clayton Torrence: Virginia
     Wills and Administrations 1632-1800, p. 400; Baltimore (1965)] Perhaps, it was his son Robert Stapleton,
     who was included in a list of rentals in 1759 in Frederick County. [Register of the Kentucky Historical
     Society, Vol. 52, p. 81; 1954] Robert and Charles (No. 59?) Stapleton were chain carriers on land surveys
     made in Augusta County, Virginia, in 1754 and 1755. [Peggy Shomo Joyner: Abstracts of Virginia's
     Northern Neck Warrants & Surveys Frederick County 1747-1780, Vol. II, pp. 64, 85, 108, 156; Portsmouth,
     Virginia (1985)]

45   Thomas Stapleton married Sarah Crook on 15 January 1756 in Baltimore, Maryland. Their children were
     Margaret born 20 March 1756, Alice born 15 September 1758, and Sarah born 22 April 1760. [Robert W.
     Barnes: Baltimore County Families, 1659-1759, Genealogical Publishing Co., p. 606]

46   James Stapelton married Elizabeth Smids at the Swedes' Church, Philadelphia, on 3 January 1759.
     [Pennsylvania Archives, Series 2, Vol. 8, p. 533: Harrisburg (1896 Reprint)]

47   Solomon Stapleton served as a chain bearer in a land survey made 26 July 1760 in what is now Dobbs
     County, North Carolina. [Margaret M. Hoffman: The Granville District of North Carolina 1748-1763,
     Abstracts of Land Grants, Vol. One, p.48] Perhaps he was the Solomon Stapleton who was listed as a
     private in the Second Company of Lt. Col. Francis Marion's South Carolina Regiment on 1 November 1779.
     [W. T. R. Saffell: Records of the Revolutionary War, 3rd ed., p. 290; Baltimore (1894)] [National Archives:
     Index of Revolutionary War Soldiers, Microcopy T515, Roll 49]

48   William Stapleton was born in 1760, died 10 June 1835, and was buried in Roberts' Cemetery, Blackwater,
     Lee County, Virginia. He was a private in Captain Posey's Company during the American Revolution.
     [Grace Catron, John Boyd Catron, and John Bruce Catron: Early Tombstone Inscriptions Lee County,
     Virginia, p. 115; (1966)] Pension records show that he was born in 1757 in Augusta County, Virginia. He
     lived in Botetourt, Montgomery, and Lee Counties in Virginia and also in Hawkins County, Tennessee. He
     married Mary ___ 8 Dcember 1793. [National Archives: Revolutionary War Pension Record #R10,064]
     William Stapleton (See No. 59) was a member of Captain James Barnett's Company for the Seventh District
     of Botetourt County, Virginia, on 31 August 1782. [Anne Lowery Worrell: Early Marriages, Wills and Some
     Revolutionary War Records Botetourt County, Virginia, p. 66; Roanoke, Virginia (1958)] He was on the
     personal tax roll of Botetourt County in 1784. [Augusta B. Fothergill and John Mark Naugle: Virginia
     Taxpayers 1782-87 Other Than Those Published by the United States Census Bureau, p. 119; Baltimore
     (1974)] William Stapleton was on the personal tax roll of Botetourt County, Virginia, in 1787. [Netti
     Schreiner-Yantis and Florence Speakman Love: The 1787 Census of Virginia, Vol. 1, p. 214; Springfield,
     Virginia (1987)] William Stapleton was granted permission to construct a water grist mill on th South Fork
     of Roan Oak in Montgomery County, Virginia, on 7 October 1794. [Lewis Preston Summers: Annals of
     Southwest Virginia, Part I, p. 854] William Stapleton was left 20 shillings in the will of his father-in-law,
     Benjamin Oney. The will was written 11 January 1790 and recorded August 1801 in Tazewell County,
     Virginia. [Netti Schreiner-Yantis: Archives of the Pioneers of Tazewell County, Virginia, p.176; Springfield,
     Virginia (1973)] Perhaps he was the William Stapleton who was on the tax roll for Sullivan County,
     Tennessee, in 1797. [Byron and Barbara Sistler: Index to Early Tennessee Tax Lists, p. 188; Evanston,
     Illinois (1977)] William Stapelton, age 78, a private in the Virginia line, was placed on the Revolutionary
     War Pension Roll on 17 October 1833 in Hawkins County, Tennessee, receiving $80.00 per year. [The
     Pension Roll of 1835, Indexed Edition, Vol. III, p. 588: The Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore]

49   George Lawson Stapleton was born in 1760 in Brunswick County, Virginia, and died in Georgia. [DAR
     Lineage Book, Vol. 91, p. 161; 1912] George and Henry Stapleton appeared on a 1799 Jury List in
     Jefferson County, Georgia. [National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 53, No. 3, p. 212; September
     1965]

50   Philip Stapleton was in a group of sailors and fisherman who arrived in Boston, Massachusetts, in December
     1763 aboard the sloop Peggy from Newfoundland. [Carl Boyer, 3rd: Ship Passenger Lists, National and New
     England (1600-1825), p. 189; Newhall, California (1977)] [Michael J. O'Brien: "Irish Immigrants to New
     England-Extracts from the Minutes of the Selectmen of the Town of Boston, Mass." in The Journal of the
     American Irish Historical Society, Vol. 13, p. 183; 1914] [Michael Tepper: New World Immigrants: A
     Consolidation of Ship Passenger Lists and Associated Data from Periodical Literature, Vol. 1, p. 467;
     Baltimore (1979)] [William H. Whitmore: Port Arrivals and Immigrants to the City of Boston, 1715-1716
     and 1762-1769, p. 27; Baltimore (1973)] He served as a private in the 7th and 12th Massachusetts Regiments
     of the Continental Line during the American Revolution. [National Archives: Index of Revolutionary War
     Soldiers, Microcopy T515, Roll 49] He was likely the Philip Stapleton who was reported as a deserter
     during the American Revolution. [Secretary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Compiler: Soldiers and
     Sailors of the Revolutionary War, Vol. 14, p. 851; Boston (1896-1908)]

51   Thomas Stapleton was received on certificate dated 20 August 1765 from the Hartshaw Monthly Meeting,
     held in Lancashire, by the Philadelphia Monthly Meeting of the Society of Friends. On 30 January 1767
     Thomas Stapleton was granted a certificate to go to the Morley Monthly Meeting in Cheshire, England.
     [William Wade Hinshaw: Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol. II, p. 658; Ann Arbor,
     Michigan (1938)]

52   Benjamin Stapleton was reprieved from death on the condition that he be transported to the American
     colonies for a term of fourteen years. Sentence was imposed in the Western Circuit of England in April
     1767. [Peter Wilson Coldham: Bonded Passengers to America, Vol. V, p. 74; Baltimore, (1983)] [Clifford
     Neal Smith: British Deportees to America, Part 3: 1766-1767 (British-American Genealogical Research
     Monograph, 3) p. 64: McNeal, Arizona (1981)]

53   Thomas Stapleton was received on certificate dated 23 August 1767 from the Stockport Preparative Meeting
     by the Philadelphia Monthly Meeting of the Society of Friends. On 8 December 1768, Thomas Stapleton,
     son of Reginald of Philadelphia, married Ann Andrews, daughter of Benjamin Kendal, of Philadelphia at
     the Philadelphia Meeting. On 27 April 1770 Thomas and his wife Ann were disowned by the Philadelphia
     Monthly Meeting. [William Wade Hinshaw: Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol. II, p. 658;
     Ann Arbor, Michigan (1938)]

54   Thomas Stapleton and his son Thomas Stapleton, Jr. were listed in 1768 on the account books of the
     trading store of Glassford and Henderson of Fairfax County, Virginia. [National Genealogical Society
     Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 4, p. 257; December 1974]

55   _____ Stapleton, a lieutenant, commanded a detachment of the 9th regiment stationed in the Bahamas when
     it was sent to St. Augustine in 1768 where all the forts were found evacuated by the Spanish. [The Virginia
     Gazette, 6 October 1768, p. 2, col. 1]

56   Thomas Stapleton was sentenced for a felony in Middlesex, England, in May 1768 and transported aboard
     the ship Tryal in June 1768 to America. [Peter Wilson Coldham: Bonded Passengers to America, Vol. II,
     p. 252; Baltimore (1983)] Probably the same Thomas Stapleton, age 25, who was reported as a runaway
     at Lower Cedar Point, Charles County, Maryland, in the Maryland Gazette from 10 May 1770 to 7 June
     1770, by Stephen Compton. [Richard J. Cox: "Maryland Runaway Convict Servants, 1745-1780" in the
     National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 69, No. 4, p. 293; December 1981]

57   Jane Stapleton was born 20 January 1769 at Port Tobacco, Maryland, died 29 June 1839, Boone County,
     Missouri, daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Garner) Stapleton. [Daughters of the American Revolution
     Magazine, Vol. 84, p. 447; 1950]

58   William Stapleton was sentenced for a felony in Middlesex, England, in September 1769 and transported
     aboard the ship Justitia in December 1769 to America. [Peter Wilson Coldham: Bonded Passengers to
     America, Vol. II, p. 252; Baltimore (1983)]

59   Charles Stapleton (See No. 21) and others were directed to examine the road from Vausses to Stapletons
     at a Court held for Botetourt County, Virginia, on 18 March 1770. He purchased 248 acres on the south
     branch of Roan Oak in Botetourt County on 7 September 1772. Charles Stapleton was listed on the tax roll
     in 1784 for Botetourt County. [Augusta B. Fothergill and John Mark Naugle: Virginia Tax Payers 1782-87
     Other Than Those Published by the United States Census Bureau, p. 119; Baltimore (1974)] He and his wife,
     Sarah, sold 48 Acres on the south fork of the Roanoke in Botetourt County in 1784. Charles Stapleton was
     listed on the 1787 personal tax rolls of Botetourt County. [Netti Schreiner-Yantis and Florene Speakman
     Love: The 1787 Census of Virginia, p. 214; Springfield, Virginia (1987)] On 2 June 1790 he purchased 54
     acres on the Senica River in Montgomery County, Virginia. His will, leaving his estate to his wife Sarah
     and unnamed children mentioned a brother William in Pennsylvania, was probated in Montgomery County
     in September 1799. Sarah and son-in-law David Willis were named executors. Sarah's will, probated 6 July
     1819 in Montgomery County, mentioned children William (See No. 48), Barnett, Elizabeth Hornbarger
     (See No. 77), and Sarah Willis (See No. 96). [Anne Lowry Worrell: A Brief of Wills and Marriages in
     Montgomery and Fincastle Counties, Virginia 1773-1831, p. 54; Roanoke] [Lewis Preston Summers: Annals
     of Southwest Virginia, pp. 70, 73, 547, 577, 921, 947-8; Baltimore (1970)] [Clayton Torrence: Virginia
     Wills and Administrations 1632-1800, p. 400; Baltimore, (1965)] [American Ancestry, Vol. IX, pp. 76-77;
     Albany, New York (1894)]

60   Thomas Stapleton had an inventory of his estate filed in 1773 in Loudoun County, Virginia. [Clayton
     Torrence: Virginia Wills and Administrations 1632-1800, p. 400; Baltimore, (1965)]

61   _____  Stapleton, age 30, a physician from Yorkshire, left the Port of Scarborough for Nova Scotia between
     5 April and 12 April 1774. [Gerald Fothergill: Emigrants from England, 1773-1776 p. 67; Boston (1913)]
     [Michael Tepper:Passengers to America, p. 288; Baltimore (1980)] ["Yorkshire, England to Nova Scotia,
     1774" in the Genealogical Reference Builders, Vol. 1, No. 9, p. 4; October-November 1967] Perhaps he
     is the same Doctor Stapleton with Tarleton's forces in the Carolinas during the American Revolution who
     refused to treat a captured and wounded American officer. [William Dobein James: A Sketch of the Life of
     Brig. Gen. Francis Marion, a History of His Brigade From Its Rise in June 1780 until Disbanded in
     December, 1782, Appendix p. 6; Marietta, Georgia (1948)] There was a report of the death in September
     1780 from a violent fever at Waxsaws, North Carolina, of Mr. Stapleton, Surgeon to the British Legion,
     a young man. [Kenneth Scott: Rivington's New York Newspaper Excerpts from a Loyalist Press, 1773-1783,
     p. 244; New York (1973)] Samuel Stapleton was a cornet in the British Legion commanded by Lt. Col.
     Banastre Tarleton on a pay list covering the period 21 October 1782 to 25 December 1782. [Murtie June
     Clark: Loyalists in the Southern Campaign of the Revolutionary War, Vol. III, p. 408; Baltimore (1981)]
     Samuel Stapleton was a Cornet of Cavalry in the British Legion during the American Revolution. [Lorenzo
     Sabine: Biographical Sketches of Loyalists of the American Revolution, Vol. II, p. 581; Boston (1864)]

62   From 9 April 1774 through 10 October 1776 Joseph Stapleton (See No. 36) and his wife Sarah purchased
     and sold land in Rowan County, North Carolina. [Mrs. Stahle Linn, Jr.: Abstracts of the Deeds of Rowan
     County, North Carolina; 1753-1785; Vols. 1-10; p. 136]

63   Susanna Stapleton, age 35, widow, from Middlesex left London aboard the ship Fanny between 27 February
     and 6 March 1775 for Virginia to be an indentured servant for 4 years. [Gerald Fothergill: Emigrants from
     England 1773-1776, p. 137; Baltimore (1965)] [Michael Tepper: Passengers to America, p. 360; Baltimore
     (1980)]

64   Joshua Stapleton, age 29, was listed in the Census of 1776 taken in the Deer Creek Lower Hundred,
     Harford County, Maryland. Also listed were Susanh (age 26), David (age 4), Edward (age 1), and Lydia
     (age 2 months). [Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh: Maryland Records, Vol. II, p. 165; Lancaster, Pennsylvania
     (1928)] Joshua Stableton was listed as the head of a household in Harford County, Maryland, at the time
     of the 1790 census. It seems likely that he was the son of the Edward Stapleton (See No. 36) who on
     12 May 1780 in Rowan County, Carolina, left by deed of gift half of his lands and the whole of his estate
     to his son Joshua Stapleton who was then living in Maryland. [Mrs. Stahle Linn, Jr.: Abstracts of the Deeds
     of Rowan County, North Carolina; 1753-1785; Vols. 1-10; p. 149] On 26 April 1806 Joshua, his wife
     Susannah, and daughter Susannah were received by the Westland (Ohio) Monthly Meeting of the Society
     of Friends from the Baltimore Monthly Meeting. In 1814 Joshua and Susannah moved to the Middleton
     (Ohio) Monthly Meeting of the Society of Friends. [William Wade Hinshaw: Encyclopedia of American
     Quaker Genealogy, Vol IV,  pp. 61, 657, Ann Arbor, Michigan, Edwards Brothers, Inc., 1946]

65   Thomas Stapleton was appointed Clerk of the ship Convention of the Pennsylvania Navy on 26 August 1776.
     [Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Vol. 1, p.432: Harrisburg, 1906]

66   Jacob Stapleton was appointed Ensign on 17 May 1777 for the Eighth Company of the Third Battalion of
     the Berks County, Pennsylvania, militia. On 10 May 1780 he received a similar appointment in the Seventh
     Company of the Fourth Battalion. [Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Vol. 5, pp. 189, 193, 208, 210:
     Harrisburg, 1906] Jacob Stapleton was the head of a household in Albany Township, Berks County,
     Pennsylvania, at the time of the 1790 census.

67   William Stapleton was appointed Drummer and Fifer on 23 June 1777 and Joshua Stapleton enlisted as a
     private on 25 June 1777 in Captain Mordecai Morgan's Company of the Chester County, Pennsylvania,
     Militia Regiment of Foot. [Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Vol. 5, pp. 465-466]

68   Andrew Stapleton (Stapelton, Stableton) was a private in the 4th and 12th and a sergeant in the 8th Virginia
     Regiments of the Continental Line during the American Revolution. [National Archives: Index of
     Revolutionary War Soldiers, Microcopy T515, Roll 49] [John H. Gwathmey: Historical Register of
     Virginians in the Revolution, p. 735; Richmond (1938)] "Andrew Stepleton, aged 73, of Switzerland Co,
     Indiana on 5 Aug 1830 states that he enlisted under Capt. William Voss of the 12th VA Regt of Col. James
     Wood of Winchester VA. He enlisted at Fort Pleasant near Winchester, VA and is now a pensioner."
     [William Lindsay Hopkins: Virginia Revolutionary War Land Grant Claims 1783-1850 (Rejected); pp. 208-8;
     Richmond (1988)] In the Pension Roll of 1835 he was living in Switzerland County, Indiana, aged 82, with
     service as a private in the Virginia Line during the American Revolution. Pension records indicate that he
     enlisted in the spring of 1777 at Romney, (West) Virginia, and served for six years and two months before
     being discharged at Winchester, Virginia. He was twice wounded. [National Archives: Revolutionary War
     Pension File #S36,799]

69   Edward Stepleton served with the 8th Virginia Regiment during the American Revolution. [John H.
     Gwathmey: Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, p. 739; Richmond (1938)]

70   Richard Stapleton served as a sergeant with the 7th Maryland Regiment of the Continental Line during the
     American Revolution. [National Archives: Index of Revolutionary War Soldiers, Microcopy T515, Roll 49]
     There is also a record of a Richard Stapleton serving in New Jersey. [William B. Stryker, Official Register
     of the Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Revolutionary War, p. 765: Trenton; 1872]

71   Joseph Stapleton was a private in the 9th and 18th Virginia Regiments of the Continental Line during the
     American Revolution. [National Archives: Index of Revolutionary War Soldiers, Microcopy T515, Roll 49]
     A Joseph Stapleton was also in the 13th Virginia Regiment. [John H. Gwathmey: Historical Register of
     Virginians in the Revolution, p. 736; Richmond (1938)]

72   George Stapleton was listed as a private in Captain Joseph Smith's Company of the King's (Carolina)
     Rangers on 29 November 1779 at Savannah, Georgia, and several subsequent dates through 24 October
     1781. [Murtie Jane Clark: Loyalists in the Southern Campaign of the Revolutionary War, Vol. I, pp. 75, 77-
     80; Baltimore (1981)]

73   John Stapleton was listed in Captain Wm. Harrod's Company in 1780, at the Stations near the Falls, in
     present day Jefferson and Shelby Counties, Kentucky. On 23 June 1780 he was listed in Captain Squire
     Boone's Company stationed at the "Painted Stone" near Shelbyville. [Lewis Collins and Richard H. Collins:
     History of Kentucky, Revised edition, Vol. I, pp. 12-13; Covington, Kentucky (1878)] He served as a
     chainman on three surveys made by Boone in 'The Painted Stone Tract' in 1781. [The Filson Club History
     Quarterly, Vol. 16, No. 3, pp. 156, 158-159; July 1942, Louisville] On 18 February 1780 he purchased 400
     acres on Chaplin's fork of the Salt River under the preemption law at the state price of 50 shillings total,
     having actually settled on the land in 1778. [Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Vol. 21,
     No. 62, p. 230; May 1923] He was a member of the Paint Creek expedition under Col. Boone which went
     against the Indians. [Lewis Collins and Richard H. Collins: History of Kentucky, Revised edition, Vol. II,
     p. 664; Covington, Kentucky (1882)] Doubtless he was the John Stapleton killed in the Battle of Blue Licks
     (said to be the last battle of the American Revolution) on 19 August 1782 while a private with troops fighting
     Indians and Canadian Rangers who had beseiged Bryan's Station. [Calendar of State Papers (Virginia),
     Vol. 3, pp. 333-4] [John H. Gwathmey: Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, pp. 735-6;
     Richmond (1938)] [The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, Vol. 47, No. 160, pp. 247-249, July
     1949 and Vol. 48., No. 162, pp. 90-93, January 1950] On 22 January 1783 Simeon Moore was appointed
     administrator of the estate of John Stapleton in Lincoln County, Kentucky. [Register of the Kentucky State
     Historical Society, Vol. 42, p.216; 1944] Apparently another John Stapleton signed a petition as a resident
     of Kentucky about 1789. [James Rood Robertson: Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky to the
     General Assembly of Virginia 1769 to 1792, p. 225; Louisville (1914)]

74   William Stapleton (See No. 42) was born in 1781 and died in 1849 at Oley, Pennsylvania. He married
     Elizabeth Drumheller in 1815. [American Ancestry, Vol. IX, pp. 76-77; Albany, New York (1894)]

75   John Stapleton signed a report on 8 September 1781 at Shuldam giving the casualties in the troops under
     Brig. Gen. Arnold. [K. G. Davies, ed.: Documents of the American Revolution 1770-1783, Vol. XIX,
     p. 175; Dublin (1978)] Probably he was the Captain Stapleton mentioned in a letter from General Sir Henry
     Clinton to Lt. Gen. Earl Cornwallis on 2 August 1781 from New York and in a letter written by Brig. Gen.
     Benedict Arnold to General Sir Henry Clinton on 8 September 1781 off Plumb Island. [K. G. Davies, ed.:
     Documents of the American Revolution 1770-1783, Vol. XX, pp. 223, 226; Dublin (1979)] He may have
     been the John Stapleton who was with the British forces at Charleston, South Carolina, on 14 November
     1782 and later in New York. He was a Captain in the 17th Light Dragoons. [Historical Manuscripts
     Commission: Report on American Manuscripts in the Royal Institution of Great Britain, Vol. III, pp. 222,
     343, 391, 401; Hereford (1907)]

76   Thomas Stapleton signed a petition to Governor Thomas Burke to restore land to John Crouse in 1782 in
     Rowan County, North Carolina. [Walter Clark: State Records of North Carolina, Vol. 19, p. 927;
     Goldsboro, North Carolina (1901)] It seems likely that he was the Thomas Stapleton listed in Capt. Lyon's
     District on the 1778 Rowan County Tax List with property valued at 148. [Mrs. Stahle Linn, Jr.: Abstracts
     of Wills and Estates Records of Rowan County, North Carolina; 1753-1805 and Tax Lists 0f 1759 and 1778;
     p. 134] He was listed in the 1835 Pension Roll, age 76, living in Clay County, Kentucky, having been a
     private in the North Carolina militia during the American Revolution. His pension record shows that he
     married Sarah Johnson in Rowan County sometime in the 1780s and she later received a pension based on
     his service. His son Edward, age 66?, gave a deposition in Owsley County, Kentucky, in 1851 stating that
     Thomas had died 15 April 1835 in Clay County and Sarah had remained a widow since that date.. His
     brother, Joshua Stapleton, living in Johnson County, Kentucky, in 1844, stated that his age was 77 years
     and  he had witnessed the wedding of Thomas and Sarah in 1783. Thomas served for two years beginning
     in 1780 or 1781 against the Indians while living in Russell County, Virginia. [National Archives:
     Revolutionary War Penion Record #W9320] Thomas Stapleton and Thomas Stapleton, Jr. were on the
     personal tax roll of Russell County, Virginia, in 1787. [Netti Schreiner-Yantis and Florence Speakman Love:
     The 1787 Census of Virginia, Vol. 1, p. 488; Springfield, Virginia (1987)] Thomas Stapleton was on the
     personal tax roll of Fayette County, Kentucky (then part of Virginia), in 1787. [Netti Schreiner-Yantis and
     Florence Speakman Love: The 1787 Census of Virginia, Vol. 1, p. 21; Springfield, Virginia (1987)]
     [Augusta B. Fothergill and John Mark Naugle: Virginia Taxpayers 1782-87 Other Than Those Published by
     the United States Census Bureau, p. 119; Baltimore (1974)] Thomas Stepleton was listed in a Schedule of
     the insolvent estate of Abraham Rees on 11 December 1787 in Burke County, North, Carolina. [Edith
     Warren Huggins: Burke County, North Carolina, Land Records and More Important Miscellaneous Records
     1751-1809, Vol. III, Southern Historical Press (1987), p.136]

77   Elizabeth Stapleton married Jacob Hornbarger, Jr. in 1782 in Montgomery County, Virginia (See No. 59).
     [Mary B. Kegley and F. B. Kegley: Early Adventurers on the Western Waters, p. 231; Orange, Virginia
     (1980)]

78   Edward Stapleton was listed on the personal tax roll of Washington County, Virginia, in 1782. [Augusta
     B. Fothergill and John Mark Naugle: Virginia Taxpayers 1782-87 Other Than Those Published by the United
     States Census Bureau, p. 119; Baltimore (1974)]

79   William Stapleton was listed on the personal tax roll of Loudon County, Virginia, in 1782. [Augusta B.
     Fothergill and John Mark Naugle: Virginia Taxpayers 1782-87 Other Than Those Published by the United
     States Census Bureau, p. 119; Baltimore (1974)] William Stableton was on the Personal tax roll in 1787 for
     Frederick County, Virginia. [Netti Schreiner-Yantis and Florence Speakman Love: The 1787 Census of
     Virginia, Vol. 1, p. 518; Springfield, Virginia (1987)] He may have been the William Stapleton who served
     as a private with the 7th Virginia Regiment or with the Independent Company of Artificers, Carpenters and
     Bakers with the Continental Troops during the American Revolution. [National Archives: Index of
     Revolutionary War Soldiers, Microcopy T515, Roll 49] [John H. Gwathmey: Historical Register of
     Virginians in the Revolution, p. 736; Richmond (1938)]

80   George W. Stapleton was born in either Kentucky or Virginia on 1 July 1784 and died in Howard County,
     Missouri, on 3 March 1833. He married Elizabeth Sheely on 22 June 1809 in Fayette County, Kentucky.
     According to family tradition the Stapletons had come from Ireland and first settled in Virginia. [Transcript,
     a Boston newspaper published 16 February 1934, Genealogical Column Item #(290)]

81   In a deed made on 30 October 1784 in Bladen County, North Carolina, mention was made that the lands
     involved adjoined those of Alexander Stapleton. [Wanda Suggs Campbell: Bladen County, North Carolina
     Abstracts of Deeds, Vol. II, p.15 (1980)] Alexander Stapleton was on the 1784 taxt list for Bladen County,
     North Carolina. [Clarence E. Ratcliff: North Carolina Taxpayers 1679-1790, Vol. 2, Baltimore, Genealogical
     Publishing Co., p. 194]. Alexr Stableton was listed as the head of a household in the Fayette District of
     Robeson County, North Carolina, at the time of the 1790 census.

82   Adam Steepelton was on the personal tax roll in 1787 of Hardy County, (West) Virginia. [Netti Schreiner-
     Yantis and Florence Speakman Love: The 1787 Census of Virginia, Vol. 1, p. 822; Springfield, Virginia
     (1987)]

83   George Stapleton was on the personal tax roll of Botetourt County, Virginia, in 1787. [Netti Schreiner-
     Yantis and Florence Speakman Love: The 1787 Census of Virginia, Vol. 1, p. 214; Springfield, Virginia
     (1987)] In 1799 George Stapleton served as surety on the marriage bond of Polly Stapleton and James
     Barnett in Botetourt County.

84   Grace Stapleton, age 16, was buried 15 January 1787 according to the records of the Philadelphia Monthly
     Meeting of the Society of Friends. [William Wade Hinshaw: Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy,
     Vol. II, p. 423; Ann Arbor, Michigan (1938)]

85   Silvester Stapleton was on a Tax List dated 4 December 1789 in Fayette County, Kentucky (then part of
     Virginia). [Charles Brunk Heinemann: "First Census" of Kentucky 1790, p. 89; Washington (1940)]

86   Avis Stapleton married Abram Vanetton on 17 December 1789 in Rowan County, North Carolina.

87   David Stapleton was born 8 March 1790, and Eleanor Stapleton was born 8 February 1795, probably in
     Kentucky. [Emma Jane Walker and Virginia Wilson: Kentucky Bible Records, Vol. I, p. 46; Lexington,
     Kentucky (1962)]

88   Abigal Stapleton was head of a household in Newbury Township, Essex County, Massachusetts, at the time
     of the 1790 census.

89   Anna Stapleton, John Stapleton, and Mary Stapleton were heads of households in Oley Township, Berks
     County, Pennsylvania, at the time of the 1790 census.

90   Issca (Isaac?) Steepleton was listed as the head of a household in Goshen Township, Chester County,
     Pennsylvania, at the time of the 1790 census.

91   Levi Stapleton and Sarah Stapleton were heads of households in Prince Fredericks Parish, Georgetown
     District, South Carolina, at the time of the 1790 census.

92   Thomas Stapleton, a shoemaker, was head of a household in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at the time of the
     1790 census.

93   William Steepleton was on the List of Robert White in Frederick County, Virginia, at the time of the 1790
     Census.

94   William Stepleton was listed as the head of a household in West Whiteland Township, Chester County,
     Pennsylvania, at the time of the 1790 census.

95   Rachel Stapleton (late Romans) was disowned on 29 October 1790 for marrying out of unity by the
     Philadelphia Monthly meeting of the Society of Friends. [William Wade Hinshaw: Encyclopedia of American
     Quaker Genealogy, Vol. II, p. 658; Ann Arbor, Michigan (1938)]

96   Sarah Stapleton married David Willis on 7 April 1791 probably in Montgomery County, Virginia (See
     No. 59). [F. B. Kegley: Kegley's Virginia Frontier, p. 596; Roanoke, Virginia (1938)]

97   Anne Steepleton married Cyrus Sackett on 7 January 1792 in Bourbon County, Kentucky.

98   Mary Stapleton was granted a certificate to go to the Baltimore Monthly Meeting on 25 April 1794 by the
     Philadelphia Monthly Meeting of the Society of Friends. [William Wade Hinshaw: Encyclopedia of American
     Quaker Genealogy, Vol. II, p. 658; Ann Arbor, Michigan (1938)]

99   Rachael Stapleton married Joel Lewis in January 1795 in Rowan County, North Carolina. According to
     Lewisana Joseph Lewis married in 1796 Rachel Stapleton, one of 4 sisters born in Maryland and orphaned
     at an early age. [Transcript, a Boston newspaper published 16 February 1934, Genealogical Column Reply
     to Item #7795]

100  Mary Stapleton married Jesse Bonsell on 2 June 1795 in Baltimore, Maryland.

101  John Stapleton married Mary Cameron on 5 October 1795 at Christ Church in Philadelphia. [Pennsylvania
     Archives, Series 2, Vol. 8, p. 251: Harrisburg (1896 Reprint)]

102  John Stapleton arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1796. From the British Isles, he filed a declaration
     on 5 September 1796 which is on file with the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. [United States, Works
     Project Administration: Index to Records of Aliens' Declarations, etc., Vol. 10, p. 269; Harrisburg,
     Pennsylvania (1940)] [P. William Filby: Philadelphia Naturalization Records, p. 627; Detroit (1982)]

103   Ruth Stapleton married Solomon Anderson on 1 August 1797 in Warren County, Kentucky.

104  John Stepleton married Nancy Ann Pearce on 18 January 1798 in Clark County, Kentucky. He was born
     8 September 1778. They had a son, Thomas Stepleton, born 13 December 1798. [Marvin J. Pearce, Sr.:
     Pearce Pioneers in Kentucky, p. 30.; El Cerrito, California (1969)]

105  Elizabeth Stapleton married James Hurst on 13 March 1798 in Mason County, Kentucky.

106  Thomas Stapleton, age 55, died 23 March 1798 and was interred in the Friends Burial Ground, Baltimore,
     Maryland. [The Maryland Historical and Genealogical Bulletin, Vol. 18, No. 3, p. 44; July 1947]



Introduction to Stapleton Family History:
Stapleton Family History:
Dr William C Stapleton's Genealogical Research:
Stapleton's Guide to Genealogy:
Stapleton Genealogy: